26 abr 2018
Ethiopia

ETHIOPIA AUTHORITIES PRESENT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES IN THEIR COUNTRY

The vice president of CEOE and president of the European Union Commission, José Vicente González, opened the day-long event.

The deputy to the Investment Commissioner for Ethiopia, Abebe Abebayehu, presented the existing business opportunities in the African country during a business meeting held at CEOE, which was opened by its vice president and president of the European Union Commission, José Vicente González. During the meeting, the past and present situation of Ethiopia, investment opportunities for Spanish companies, bilateral business relations and the reasons for doing business in this country were presented.

The deputy to the Investment Commissioner for Ethiopia, Abebe Abebayehu, presented the existing business opportunities in Ethiopia
The deputy to the Investment Commissioner for Ethiopia, Abebe Abebayehu, presented the existing business opportunities in Ethiopia — ©CEOE

Participants in the event included the General Director of International Economic Relations for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Cristina Serrano Leal; the general director of Commercial Policy and Competitiveness for the Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness, Antonio García Rebollar; the general deputy director for Trade Policy with Mediterranean Countries, Africa and the Middle East, Myriam Pérez Nogueira; the Ambassador of Ethiopia to France, Ali Sulaiman Mohammed; the Ambassador of Spain to Ethiopia, Borja Montesino; the President of Ruperez International LLC, Javier Rupérez and the President of EFORE Consultores, Pedro Piñar. Raimundo Robredo, Director General for Africa at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, closed the event.

The vice president of CEOE and president of the Commission on the European Union, José Vicente González, highlighted Ethiopia’s fast economic growth between 2005 and 2016, posting an annual average of 10.7% of GDP. He added that such growth is expected to continue in the coming years at an annual average of 8% of GDP, which could make Ethiopia one of the largest economies of Africa.

González reported that, with the process of reforms underway and an ambitious investment plan aimed at improving the living conditions of the population and modernizing the country's infrastructure, Ethiopia is starting to attract productive investments from abroad, especially in the textile sector and the leather industry. "This renewed interest in the country is also possible due to the improvement of railway communications with the Port of Djibouti, which is the main port of entry and exit of a country such as Ethiopia, with no natural access to the sea," he said.